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Derma
2 Min Read
19 Jul

Bonito elastin peptide improves biophysical properties in aging skin

A recent study found that Bonito elastin peptide (VGPG Elastin®) when taken orally has been shown to diminish fine wrinkles, lower melanin levels, and improve skin hydration. This study’s results were published in the journal, Skin research and technology.

In this double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, a total of 100 participants were randomly divided into two groups, with one group receiving a test product that contained 100 mg of Bonito elastin peptide (VGPG Elastin®), while the other group received a placebo. The parameters of hydration, skin wrinkles, and brightening (melanin index) were measured at the start of the study and subsequently at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the intervention.

After 12 weeks of intervention, the test group demonstrated considerable enhancements in average skin roughness, maximum peak height of the wrinkle, maximum peak-to-valley values,  average maximum height of the wrinkle, maximum valley depth of the wrinkle, and eye wrinkle volume when compared to the placebo group. Additionally, skin hydration levels improved, and the melanin index was significantly lower in the test group than in the placebo group. Notably, no adverse events related to the test product were reported by any participant.

Thus, it can be concluded that oral consumption of Bonito elastin peptide (VGPG Elastin®) effectively reduces the appearance of fine wrinkles, decrease melanin index, and improve skin hydration. These findings suggest that it may be a potential treatment option for combating wrinkles, dryness, and pigmentation issues.

Bonito elastin peptide improves biophysical properties in aging skin

A recent study found that Bonito elastin peptide (VGPG Elastin®) when taken orally has been shown to diminish fine wrinkles, lower melanin levels, and improve skin hydration. This study’s results were published in the journal, Skin research and technology.

In this double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, a total of 100 participants were randomly divided into two groups, with one group receiving a test product that contained 100 mg of Bonito elastin peptide (VGPG Elastin®), while the other group received a placebo. The parameters of hydration, skin wrinkles, and brightening (melanin index) were measured at the start of the study and subsequently at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the intervention.

After 12 weeks of intervention, the test group demonstrated considerable enhancements in average skin roughness, maximum peak height of the wrinkle, maximum peak-to-valley values,  average maximum height of the wrinkle, maximum valley depth of the wrinkle, and eye wrinkle volume when compared to the placebo group. Additionally, skin hydration levels improved, and the melanin index was significantly lower in the test group than in the placebo group. Notably, no adverse events related to the test product were reported by any participant.

Thus, it can be concluded that oral consumption of Bonito elastin peptide (VGPG Elastin®) effectively reduces the appearance of fine wrinkles, decrease melanin index, and improve skin hydration. These findings suggest that it may be a potential treatment option for combating wrinkles, dryness, and pigmentation issues.

Derma
2 Min Read
19 Jul

Bonito elastin peptide improves biophysical properties in aging skin

A recent study found that Bonito elastin peptide (VGPG Elastin®) when taken orally has been shown to diminish fine wrinkles, lower melanin levels, and improve skin hydration. This study’s results were published in the journal, Skin research and technology.

In this double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, a total of 100 participants were randomly divided into two groups, with one group receiving a test product that contained 100 mg of Bonito elastin peptide (VGPG Elastin®), while the other group received a placebo. The parameters of hydration, skin wrinkles, and brightening (melanin index) were measured at the start of the study and subsequently at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the intervention.

After 12 weeks of intervention, the test group demonstrated considerable enhancements in average skin roughness, maximum peak height of the wrinkle, maximum peak-to-valley values,  average maximum height of the wrinkle, maximum valley depth of the wrinkle, and eye wrinkle volume when compared to the placebo group. Additionally, skin hydration levels improved, and the melanin index was significantly lower in the test group than in the placebo group. Notably, no adverse events related to the test product were reported by any participant.

Thus, it can be concluded that oral consumption of Bonito elastin peptide (VGPG Elastin®) effectively reduces the appearance of fine wrinkles, decrease melanin index, and improve skin hydration. These findings suggest that it may be a potential treatment option for combating wrinkles, dryness, and pigmentation issues.

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Pediatric
3 Min Read
19 Jul

Uncovering the future of pediatric research in India by addressing challenges and revealing opportunities

This study examined the present state of pediatric research in India, highlighting challenges like insufficient funding, lack of research facilities, complex regulatory systems, and the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity. Despite these challenges, there are many opportunities for improving child health outcomes through technological advancements. This study was published in the IP International Journal of Medical Paediatrics and Oncology.

This paper provides several applications for improving pediatric health outcomes. Artificial Intelligence (AI) holds very good scope in pediatric research to analyze data, predict disease conditions, and develop individualized treatment plans. It can be beneficial to analyze larger datasets to find out patterns associated with pediatric diseases for early detection and the development of personalized treatment strategies. Integrating AI into general pediatric research and its application can immensely improve healthcare accessibility in India, irrespective of dynamic social and economic scenarios.

Proteomics research allows us to better understand the structure and function of proteins in various diseases; hence, proteomics research is important for investigating disease mechanisms. Similarly, it can be used for monitoring disease susceptibility and progression, monitoring treatment effectiveness, and assessing the likelihood of exacerbations.

Microbiome research can help us to understand the impact of the microbiome on child health and shed light on the relationship between gut bacteria, the immune system, the central nervous system, and metabolic processes.

Nanotechnology opens new possibilities for targeted drug delivery and precision medicine among children. Engineered nanoparticles with increased efficacy and minimal systemic toxicity can be potentially used in the treatment of pediatric cancer and viral infectious diseases.

The use of advanced fetal imaging technology and early treatment can prevent congenital abnormalities. Adolescent health research can help to deal with mental health problems, nutrition deficiency problems, and lifestyle diseases that Indian teenagers are facing today.

Pediatric interventional radiology includes advanced imaging technologies to diagnose and treat various conditions by utilizing minimally invasive procedures with less recovery time and complications. Improving access to interventional radiology in India has the potential to widen treatment options for pediatric cardiac defects, birth defects, and cancer-related issues.

To conclude, pediatric research in India can be transformed by navigating current challenges and seizing emerging opportunities. The integration of AI, microbiome research, nanotechnology, interventional radiology, and the progress in fetal as well as adolescent health will cater for precise diagnosis and personalized treatment plans, leading to improved health outcomes in children and adolescents.

Uncovering the future of pediatric research in India by addressing challenges and revealing opportunities

This study examined the present state of pediatric research in India, highlighting challenges like insufficient funding, lack of research facilities, complex regulatory systems, and the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity. Despite these challenges, there are many opportunities for improving child health outcomes through technological advancements. This study was published in the IP International Journal of Medical Paediatrics and Oncology.

This paper provides several applications for improving pediatric health outcomes. Artificial Intelligence (AI) holds very good scope in pediatric research to analyze data, predict disease conditions, and develop individualized treatment plans. It can be beneficial to analyze larger datasets to find out patterns associated with pediatric diseases for early detection and the development of personalized treatment strategies. Integrating AI into general pediatric research and its application can immensely improve healthcare accessibility in India, irrespective of dynamic social and economic scenarios.

Proteomics research allows us to better understand the structure and function of proteins in various diseases; hence, proteomics research is important for investigating disease mechanisms. Similarly, it can be used for monitoring disease susceptibility and progression, monitoring treatment effectiveness, and assessing the likelihood of exacerbations.

Microbiome research can help us to understand the impact of the microbiome on child health and shed light on the relationship between gut bacteria, the immune system, the central nervous system, and metabolic processes.

Nanotechnology opens new possibilities for targeted drug delivery and precision medicine among children. Engineered nanoparticles with increased efficacy and minimal systemic toxicity can be potentially used in the treatment of pediatric cancer and viral infectious diseases.

The use of advanced fetal imaging technology and early treatment can prevent congenital abnormalities. Adolescent health research can help to deal with mental health problems, nutrition deficiency problems, and lifestyle diseases that Indian teenagers are facing today.

Pediatric interventional radiology includes advanced imaging technologies to diagnose and treat various conditions by utilizing minimally invasive procedures with less recovery time and complications. Improving access to interventional radiology in India has the potential to widen treatment options for pediatric cardiac defects, birth defects, and cancer-related issues.

To conclude, pediatric research in India can be transformed by navigating current challenges and seizing emerging opportunities. The integration of AI, microbiome research, nanotechnology, interventional radiology, and the progress in fetal as well as adolescent health will cater for precise diagnosis and personalized treatment plans, leading to improved health outcomes in children and adolescents.

Pediatric
3 Min Read
19 Jul

Uncovering the future of pediatric research in India by addressing challenges and revealing opportunities

This study examined the present state of pediatric research in India, highlighting challenges like insufficient funding, lack of research facilities, complex regulatory systems, and the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity. Despite these challenges, there are many opportunities for improving child health outcomes through technological advancements. This study was published in the IP International Journal of Medical Paediatrics and Oncology.

This paper provides several applications for improving pediatric health outcomes. Artificial Intelligence (AI) holds very good scope in pediatric research to analyze data, predict disease conditions, and develop individualized treatment plans. It can be beneficial to analyze larger datasets to find out patterns associated with pediatric diseases for early detection and the development of personalized treatment strategies. Integrating AI into general pediatric research and its application can immensely improve healthcare accessibility in India, irrespective of dynamic social and economic scenarios.

Proteomics research allows us to better understand the structure and function of proteins in various diseases; hence, proteomics research is important for investigating disease mechanisms. Similarly, it can be used for monitoring disease susceptibility and progression, monitoring treatment effectiveness, and assessing the likelihood of exacerbations.

Microbiome research can help us to understand the impact of the microbiome on child health and shed light on the relationship between gut bacteria, the immune system, the central nervous system, and metabolic processes.

Nanotechnology opens new possibilities for targeted drug delivery and precision medicine among children. Engineered nanoparticles with increased efficacy and minimal systemic toxicity can be potentially used in the treatment of pediatric cancer and viral infectious diseases.

The use of advanced fetal imaging technology and early treatment can prevent congenital abnormalities. Adolescent health research can help to deal with mental health problems, nutrition deficiency problems, and lifestyle diseases that Indian teenagers are facing today.

Pediatric interventional radiology includes advanced imaging technologies to diagnose and treat various conditions by utilizing minimally invasive procedures with less recovery time and complications. Improving access to interventional radiology in India has the potential to widen treatment options for pediatric cardiac defects, birth defects, and cancer-related issues.

To conclude, pediatric research in India can be transformed by navigating current challenges and seizing emerging opportunities. The integration of AI, microbiome research, nanotechnology, interventional radiology, and the progress in fetal as well as adolescent health will cater for precise diagnosis and personalized treatment plans, leading to improved health outcomes in children and adolescents.

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Gastro
2 Min Read
18 Jul

Efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) injections for the treatment of faecal incontinence

A recent study suggests that intrarectal botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) injections are an efficacious treatment for urge faecal incontinence. This study was published in the journal, The Lancet. Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

This phase 3 study was a double-blind, multicentre, randomized trial that included 200 adult patients who had experienced a failure of conservative or surgical treatment or had at least one urgency or faecal incontinence episode per week for a minimum of 3 months. After withdrawals, the patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either 200 units of BoNTA (n=96) or an equivalent volume of saline or placebo (n=95) injections. Three months after treatment, the number of episodes of faecal incontinence and urgency recorded in 21-day patient bowel diaries served as the primary endpoint. For the primary analysis, a modified intention-to-treat (mITT) approach was utilized, with adjustment for baseline faecal incontinence and urgency episodes.

At the end of the study, it was observed that in the BoNTA group, the mean number of faecal incontinence and urgency episodes per day, decreased from 1·9 at baseline to 0.8 at 3 months after the injections were administered while in the placebo group, it decreased from 1.4 to 1.0. The trial did not report any serious treatment-related adverse events. The non-serious adverse event (treatment-related or not) that was frequently seen was constipation, seen in 68 patients in the BoNTA group and 38 patients in the placebo group. From the above results, it can be concluded that BoNTA injections are an efficacious treatment for urge faecal incontinence in adult patients.

Efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) injections for the treatment of faecal incontinence

A recent study suggests that intrarectal botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) injections are an efficacious treatment for urge faecal incontinence. This study was published in the journal, The Lancet. Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

This phase 3 study was a double-blind, multicentre, randomized trial that included 200 adult patients who had experienced a failure of conservative or surgical treatment or had at least one urgency or faecal incontinence episode per week for a minimum of 3 months. After withdrawals, the patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either 200 units of BoNTA (n=96) or an equivalent volume of saline or placebo (n=95) injections. Three months after treatment, the number of episodes of faecal incontinence and urgency recorded in 21-day patient bowel diaries served as the primary endpoint. For the primary analysis, a modified intention-to-treat (mITT) approach was utilized, with adjustment for baseline faecal incontinence and urgency episodes.

At the end of the study, it was observed that in the BoNTA group, the mean number of faecal incontinence and urgency episodes per day, decreased from 1·9 at baseline to 0.8 at 3 months after the injections were administered while in the placebo group, it decreased from 1.4 to 1.0. The trial did not report any serious treatment-related adverse events. The non-serious adverse event (treatment-related or not) that was frequently seen was constipation, seen in 68 patients in the BoNTA group and 38 patients in the placebo group. From the above results, it can be concluded that BoNTA injections are an efficacious treatment for urge faecal incontinence in adult patients.

Gastro
2 Min Read
18 Jul

Efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) injections for the treatment of faecal incontinence

A recent study suggests that intrarectal botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) injections are an efficacious treatment for urge faecal incontinence. This study was published in the journal, The Lancet. Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

This phase 3 study was a double-blind, multicentre, randomized trial that included 200 adult patients who had experienced a failure of conservative or surgical treatment or had at least one urgency or faecal incontinence episode per week for a minimum of 3 months. After withdrawals, the patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either 200 units of BoNTA (n=96) or an equivalent volume of saline or placebo (n=95) injections. Three months after treatment, the number of episodes of faecal incontinence and urgency recorded in 21-day patient bowel diaries served as the primary endpoint. For the primary analysis, a modified intention-to-treat (mITT) approach was utilized, with adjustment for baseline faecal incontinence and urgency episodes.

At the end of the study, it was observed that in the BoNTA group, the mean number of faecal incontinence and urgency episodes per day, decreased from 1·9 at baseline to 0.8 at 3 months after the injections were administered while in the placebo group, it decreased from 1.4 to 1.0. The trial did not report any serious treatment-related adverse events. The non-serious adverse event (treatment-related or not) that was frequently seen was constipation, seen in 68 patients in the BoNTA group and 38 patients in the placebo group. From the above results, it can be concluded that BoNTA injections are an efficacious treatment for urge faecal incontinence in adult patients.

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Pediatric
2 Min Read
17 Jul

The efficacy of lubiprostone in the treatment of functional constipation in adolescents and children

A recent study has shown that lubiprostone is effective and has good tolerability as a pharmacotherapy for children and adolescents, offering a potential shift in the treatment approach for pediatric functional constipation (FC). This study’s findings were published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

This single-blinded, randomized controlled trial included 280 patients (aged 8-18 years) with FC. These patients were randomly assigned to receive either a weight-based lubiprostone dose (n = 140) or conventional laxatives (n = 140), which included bisacodyl, lactulose, or sodium picosulfate, for a duration of 12 weeks. Subsequently, a 4-week posttreatment follow-up was carried out.

The lubiprostone group demonstrated an improvement in constipation in 91.4% (128 patients) when compared to 34.3% (48 patients) in the conventional therapy group and persisted even after treatment discontinuation. Additionally, within 48 hours of starting the medication, one quarter of the lubiprostone group experienced their first spontaneous bowel movement. Throughout the last 4 weeks of therapy and the subsequent 4 weeks of follow-up, 75.7% of the lubiprostone group maintained a Bristol stool form of 3 or 4 compared to 35.7% (50 patients) in the conventional therapy group. No life-threatening adverse drug reactions were reported, and no patients discontinued treatment due to adverse effects.

Thus, it can be concluded that lubiprostone may be a well-tolerated and effective pharmacotherapy for children and adolescents, presenting a promising alternative in the management of pediatric functional constipation (FC).

The efficacy of lubiprostone in the treatment of functional constipation in adolescents and children

A recent study has shown that lubiprostone is effective and has good tolerability as a pharmacotherapy for children and adolescents, offering a potential shift in the treatment approach for pediatric functional constipation (FC). This study’s findings were published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

This single-blinded, randomized controlled trial included 280 patients (aged 8-18 years) with FC. These patients were randomly assigned to receive either a weight-based lubiprostone dose (n = 140) or conventional laxatives (n = 140), which included bisacodyl, lactulose, or sodium picosulfate, for a duration of 12 weeks. Subsequently, a 4-week posttreatment follow-up was carried out.

The lubiprostone group demonstrated an improvement in constipation in 91.4% (128 patients) when compared to 34.3% (48 patients) in the conventional therapy group and persisted even after treatment discontinuation. Additionally, within 48 hours of starting the medication, one quarter of the lubiprostone group experienced their first spontaneous bowel movement. Throughout the last 4 weeks of therapy and the subsequent 4 weeks of follow-up, 75.7% of the lubiprostone group maintained a Bristol stool form of 3 or 4 compared to 35.7% (50 patients) in the conventional therapy group. No life-threatening adverse drug reactions were reported, and no patients discontinued treatment due to adverse effects.

Thus, it can be concluded that lubiprostone may be a well-tolerated and effective pharmacotherapy for children and adolescents, presenting a promising alternative in the management of pediatric functional constipation (FC).

Pediatric
2 Min Read
17 Jul

The efficacy of lubiprostone in the treatment of functional constipation in adolescents and children

A recent study has shown that lubiprostone is effective and has good tolerability as a pharmacotherapy for children and adolescents, offering a potential shift in the treatment approach for pediatric functional constipation (FC). This study’s findings were published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

This single-blinded, randomized controlled trial included 280 patients (aged 8-18 years) with FC. These patients were randomly assigned to receive either a weight-based lubiprostone dose (n = 140) or conventional laxatives (n = 140), which included bisacodyl, lactulose, or sodium picosulfate, for a duration of 12 weeks. Subsequently, a 4-week posttreatment follow-up was carried out.

The lubiprostone group demonstrated an improvement in constipation in 91.4% (128 patients) when compared to 34.3% (48 patients) in the conventional therapy group and persisted even after treatment discontinuation. Additionally, within 48 hours of starting the medication, one quarter of the lubiprostone group experienced their first spontaneous bowel movement. Throughout the last 4 weeks of therapy and the subsequent 4 weeks of follow-up, 75.7% of the lubiprostone group maintained a Bristol stool form of 3 or 4 compared to 35.7% (50 patients) in the conventional therapy group. No life-threatening adverse drug reactions were reported, and no patients discontinued treatment due to adverse effects.

Thus, it can be concluded that lubiprostone may be a well-tolerated and effective pharmacotherapy for children and adolescents, presenting a promising alternative in the management of pediatric functional constipation (FC).

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Cough
2 Min Read
16 Jul

Indian consensus on the management of cough in primary care settings (INDICATOR)

The existing consensus meets the present requirement and can assist doctors in diagnosing and treating cough efficiently in the primary healthcare facilities in India. This consensus was published in The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India.

A consensus on clinical statements was achieved through the use of the modified Delphi method. The panel consisted of 10 experts, encompassing pulmonologists, otolaryngologists, a general physician and a pediatrician. The discussions were focused on the domains of definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

A total of 109 clinical statements were developed, with 75 achieving consensus, 13 reaching near consensus, and 21 failing to reach consensus. The empirical use of nonopioid antitussive agents for relieving symptoms of acute dry cough is recommended. Symptom relief for cough associated with upper airway cough syndrome (UACS) or rhinitis may be achieved by considering the use of fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) containing oral antihistamines, mucoactive agents, or oral decongestants. Adequate hydration plays a key role in managing a productive cough. Codeine-based preparations should be reserved as a last resort for patients with unexplained chronic cough when other treatments have proven ineffective. Insights were gathered on nonpharmacologic therapy, special populations, red flag signs, and referral to specialized centers. A management algorithm with an integrated care pathway approach for subacute, acute, and chronic coughs was recommended by subject matter experts.

It can be concluded that the current consensus meets the existing needs and can support the physician in diagnosing and managing cough effectively in the primary healthcare setting in India. The general consensus was that the use of fixed-dose combination medications containing oral antihistamines, mucoactive agents, or oral decongestants can help relieve symptoms of UACS or rhinitis. Maintaining proper hydration can also alleviate productive coughs, and it is recommended to consider codeine-based treatments only if other treatments have proven ineffective.

Indian consensus on the management of cough in primary care settings (INDICATOR)

The existing consensus meets the present requirement and can assist doctors in diagnosing and treating cough efficiently in the primary healthcare facilities in India. This consensus was published in The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India.

A consensus on clinical statements was achieved through the use of the modified Delphi method. The panel consisted of 10 experts, encompassing pulmonologists, otolaryngologists, a general physician and a pediatrician. The discussions were focused on the domains of definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

A total of 109 clinical statements were developed, with 75 achieving consensus, 13 reaching near consensus, and 21 failing to reach consensus. The empirical use of nonopioid antitussive agents for relieving symptoms of acute dry cough is recommended. Symptom relief for cough associated with upper airway cough syndrome (UACS) or rhinitis may be achieved by considering the use of fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) containing oral antihistamines, mucoactive agents, or oral decongestants. Adequate hydration plays a key role in managing a productive cough. Codeine-based preparations should be reserved as a last resort for patients with unexplained chronic cough when other treatments have proven ineffective. Insights were gathered on nonpharmacologic therapy, special populations, red flag signs, and referral to specialized centers. A management algorithm with an integrated care pathway approach for subacute, acute, and chronic coughs was recommended by subject matter experts.

It can be concluded that the current consensus meets the existing needs and can support the physician in diagnosing and managing cough effectively in the primary healthcare setting in India. The general consensus was that the use of fixed-dose combination medications containing oral antihistamines, mucoactive agents, or oral decongestants can help relieve symptoms of UACS or rhinitis. Maintaining proper hydration can also alleviate productive coughs, and it is recommended to consider codeine-based treatments only if other treatments have proven ineffective.

Cough
2 Min Read
16 Jul

Indian consensus on the management of cough in primary care settings (INDICATOR)

The existing consensus meets the present requirement and can assist doctors in diagnosing and treating cough efficiently in the primary healthcare facilities in India. This consensus was published in The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India.

A consensus on clinical statements was achieved through the use of the modified Delphi method. The panel consisted of 10 experts, encompassing pulmonologists, otolaryngologists, a general physician and a pediatrician. The discussions were focused on the domains of definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

A total of 109 clinical statements were developed, with 75 achieving consensus, 13 reaching near consensus, and 21 failing to reach consensus. The empirical use of nonopioid antitussive agents for relieving symptoms of acute dry cough is recommended. Symptom relief for cough associated with upper airway cough syndrome (UACS) or rhinitis may be achieved by considering the use of fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) containing oral antihistamines, mucoactive agents, or oral decongestants. Adequate hydration plays a key role in managing a productive cough. Codeine-based preparations should be reserved as a last resort for patients with unexplained chronic cough when other treatments have proven ineffective. Insights were gathered on nonpharmacologic therapy, special populations, red flag signs, and referral to specialized centers. A management algorithm with an integrated care pathway approach for subacute, acute, and chronic coughs was recommended by subject matter experts.

It can be concluded that the current consensus meets the existing needs and can support the physician in diagnosing and managing cough effectively in the primary healthcare setting in India. The general consensus was that the use of fixed-dose combination medications containing oral antihistamines, mucoactive agents, or oral decongestants can help relieve symptoms of UACS or rhinitis. Maintaining proper hydration can also alleviate productive coughs, and it is recommended to consider codeine-based treatments only if other treatments have proven ineffective.

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Gastro
2 Min Read
15 Jul

Effectiveness of seladelpar in primary biliary cholangitis patients

A recent study suggests that seladelpar notably decreased pruritus in individuals with moderate to severe pruritus at the baseline. The study’s findings  were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

In this phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, a total of 193 patients (who had an inadequate response to or had a previous medical history of adverse side effects with ursodeoxycholic acid) were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to either receive oral seladelpar at a daily dose of 10 mg or placebo. The primary endpoint of the study was a biochemical response, characterized by an alkaline phosphatase level < 1.67 times the upper limit of normal, showing a reduction of 15% or greater from the baseline, and a normal total bilirubin level by the end of the 12th month. Key secondary endpoints included the normalization of alkaline phosphatase level at 12th month  and the change in pruritus numerical rating scale score from baseline to 6th month among patients with a baseline score of at least 4 (denoting moderate-to-severe pruritus).

A higher proportion of patients in the seladelpar group experienced a biochemical response compared to those in the placebo group (61.7% vs. 20.0%). Additionally, a larger percentage of patients who were treated with seladelpar saw normalization of alkaline phosphatase levels in comparison to those who received a placebo (25.0% vs. 0%). Seladelpar also led to a more significant decrease in pruritus numerical rating scale scores than the placebo (-3.2 vs. -1.7).

Therefore, it can be concluded that the proportion of patients achieving a biochemical response and normalization of alkaline phosphatase was significantly higher with seladelpar compared to placebo. Additionally, seladelpar demonstrated a significant reduction in pruritus for primary biliary cholangitis patients experiencing moderate-to-severe pruritus at the baseline.

Effectiveness of seladelpar in primary biliary cholangitis patients

A recent study suggests that seladelpar notably decreased pruritus in individuals with moderate to severe pruritus at the baseline. The study’s findings  were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

In this phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, a total of 193 patients (who had an inadequate response to or had a previous medical history of adverse side effects with ursodeoxycholic acid) were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to either receive oral seladelpar at a daily dose of 10 mg or placebo. The primary endpoint of the study was a biochemical response, characterized by an alkaline phosphatase level < 1.67 times the upper limit of normal, showing a reduction of 15% or greater from the baseline, and a normal total bilirubin level by the end of the 12th month. Key secondary endpoints included the normalization of alkaline phosphatase level at 12th month  and the change in pruritus numerical rating scale score from baseline to 6th month among patients with a baseline score of at least 4 (denoting moderate-to-severe pruritus).

A higher proportion of patients in the seladelpar group experienced a biochemical response compared to those in the placebo group (61.7% vs. 20.0%). Additionally, a larger percentage of patients who were treated with seladelpar saw normalization of alkaline phosphatase levels in comparison to those who received a placebo (25.0% vs. 0%). Seladelpar also led to a more significant decrease in pruritus numerical rating scale scores than the placebo (-3.2 vs. -1.7).

Therefore, it can be concluded that the proportion of patients achieving a biochemical response and normalization of alkaline phosphatase was significantly higher with seladelpar compared to placebo. Additionally, seladelpar demonstrated a significant reduction in pruritus for primary biliary cholangitis patients experiencing moderate-to-severe pruritus at the baseline.

Gastro
2 Min Read
15 Jul

Effectiveness of seladelpar in primary biliary cholangitis patients

A recent study suggests that seladelpar notably decreased pruritus in individuals with moderate to severe pruritus at the baseline. The study’s findings  were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

In this phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, a total of 193 patients (who had an inadequate response to or had a previous medical history of adverse side effects with ursodeoxycholic acid) were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to either receive oral seladelpar at a daily dose of 10 mg or placebo. The primary endpoint of the study was a biochemical response, characterized by an alkaline phosphatase level < 1.67 times the upper limit of normal, showing a reduction of 15% or greater from the baseline, and a normal total bilirubin level by the end of the 12th month. Key secondary endpoints included the normalization of alkaline phosphatase level at 12th month  and the change in pruritus numerical rating scale score from baseline to 6th month among patients with a baseline score of at least 4 (denoting moderate-to-severe pruritus).

A higher proportion of patients in the seladelpar group experienced a biochemical response compared to those in the placebo group (61.7% vs. 20.0%). Additionally, a larger percentage of patients who were treated with seladelpar saw normalization of alkaline phosphatase levels in comparison to those who received a placebo (25.0% vs. 0%). Seladelpar also led to a more significant decrease in pruritus numerical rating scale scores than the placebo (-3.2 vs. -1.7).

Therefore, it can be concluded that the proportion of patients achieving a biochemical response and normalization of alkaline phosphatase was significantly higher with seladelpar compared to placebo. Additionally, seladelpar demonstrated a significant reduction in pruritus for primary biliary cholangitis patients experiencing moderate-to-severe pruritus at the baseline.

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Cardiac
2 Min Read
15 Jul

Long-term effects of bariatric surgery on hypertension in patients with obesity

A recent study found that bariatric surgery presented an effective and durable strategy for high blood pressure in obese patients. The conclusions of this study were published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

In this randomized clinical trial, 100 participants with grade 1 or 2 obesity with hypertension and using a minimum of two medications were enrolled. These individuals were randomly allocated to receive either Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in conjunction with medical therapy (MT) or MT alone.  The original primary outcome of the study was lessening at least 30% of the total antihypertensive medications, while still maintaining blood pressure levels at <140/90 mm Hg at 5 years.

At the end of 5 years, it was observed that BMI (body mass index) was 36.40 kg/m2 and 28.01 kg/m2 for MT and RYGB. RYGB showed a greater rate in the number of medication reduction when compared to MT. The mean number of antihypertensive medications was 2.97 and 0.80 for MT and RYGB, respectively. Hypertensive remission rates were 2.4% vs 46.9%.

Based on the above results, it can be concluded that the rate of resistant hypertension may be lower after RYGB, thus showing that bariatric surgery may offer an effective and durable strategy to control high blood pressure in patients suffering from obesity.

Long-term effects of bariatric surgery on hypertension in patients with obesity

A recent study found that bariatric surgery presented an effective and durable strategy for high blood pressure in obese patients. The conclusions of this study were published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

In this randomized clinical trial, 100 participants with grade 1 or 2 obesity with hypertension and using a minimum of two medications were enrolled. These individuals were randomly allocated to receive either Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in conjunction with medical therapy (MT) or MT alone.  The original primary outcome of the study was lessening at least 30% of the total antihypertensive medications, while still maintaining blood pressure levels at <140/90 mm Hg at 5 years.

At the end of 5 years, it was observed that BMI (body mass index) was 36.40 kg/m2 and 28.01 kg/m2 for MT and RYGB. RYGB showed a greater rate in the number of medication reduction when compared to MT. The mean number of antihypertensive medications was 2.97 and 0.80 for MT and RYGB, respectively. Hypertensive remission rates were 2.4% vs 46.9%.

Based on the above results, it can be concluded that the rate of resistant hypertension may be lower after RYGB, thus showing that bariatric surgery may offer an effective and durable strategy to control high blood pressure in patients suffering from obesity.

Cardiac
2 Min Read
15 Jul

Long-term effects of bariatric surgery on hypertension in patients with obesity

A recent study found that bariatric surgery presented an effective and durable strategy for high blood pressure in obese patients. The conclusions of this study were published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

In this randomized clinical trial, 100 participants with grade 1 or 2 obesity with hypertension and using a minimum of two medications were enrolled. These individuals were randomly allocated to receive either Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in conjunction with medical therapy (MT) or MT alone.  The original primary outcome of the study was lessening at least 30% of the total antihypertensive medications, while still maintaining blood pressure levels at <140/90 mm Hg at 5 years.

At the end of 5 years, it was observed that BMI (body mass index) was 36.40 kg/m2 and 28.01 kg/m2 for MT and RYGB. RYGB showed a greater rate in the number of medication reduction when compared to MT. The mean number of antihypertensive medications was 2.97 and 0.80 for MT and RYGB, respectively. Hypertensive remission rates were 2.4% vs 46.9%.

Based on the above results, it can be concluded that the rate of resistant hypertension may be lower after RYGB, thus showing that bariatric surgery may offer an effective and durable strategy to control high blood pressure in patients suffering from obesity.

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Pediatric
2 Min Read
12 Jul

The combination of lung ultrasound and procalcitonin has the potential to enhance pneumonia management

A recent study demonstrated that the combination of lung ultrasound (LUS) and procalcitonin (PCT) proved to be a safe approach for treating bacterial pneumonia (BP), as it avoided the use of radiation and did not result in any additional costs. This study’s findings were published in the European Journal of Medical Research.

In this blinded, randomized clinical trial, a total of 194 children under the age of 18 with suspected bacterial pneumonia (BP) were enrolled. Among them, 96 children were randomly assigned to the experimental group (EG) and 98 children to the control group (CG). The randomization was based on whether lung ultrasound (LUS) or chest X-ray (CXR) was performed as the initial imaging test. The patients were then classified into three groups: 1) those with LUS/CXR results not suggestive of BP and PCT levels below 1 ng/mL, for whom no antibiotics were recommended; 2) those with LUS/CXR results suggestive of BP, inspite of the PCT value, for whom antibiotics were recommended; and 3) those with LUS/CXR results not suggestive of BP but with PCT levels above 1 ng/mL, for whom antibiotics were also recommended.

Out of the 194 patients, the image test did not suggest the presence of BP in 75 individuals with a PCT level below 1 ng/ml. 29/52 in the experimental group and 11/23 in the control group did not receive antibiotics. The image test indicated the presence of BP in 101 patients. 34/34 patients in the experimental group and 57/67 patients in the control group were prescribed antibiotics. Notably, there were statistically significant differences between the groups when the PCT level was below 1 ng/ml (p = 0.01). In 18 patients, the image test did not suggest BP, but their PCT level was above 1 ng/ml, and all of them were administered antibiotics. Additionally, a total of 0.035 mSv radiation per patient was avoided, and there was a 77% reduction in CXR per patient. The use of LUS did not result in a significant increase in costs.

Thus, it can be concluded that the utilization of LUS in conjunction with PCT was demonstrated to be a reliable strategy in the treatment of BP, without the necessity of radiation exposure or incurring additional costs.

The combination of lung ultrasound and procalcitonin has the potential to enhance pneumonia management

A recent study demonstrated that the combination of lung ultrasound (LUS) and procalcitonin (PCT) proved to be a safe approach for treating bacterial pneumonia (BP), as it avoided the use of radiation and did not result in any additional costs. This study’s findings were published in the European Journal of Medical Research.

In this blinded, randomized clinical trial, a total of 194 children under the age of 18 with suspected bacterial pneumonia (BP) were enrolled. Among them, 96 children were randomly assigned to the experimental group (EG) and 98 children to the control group (CG). The randomization was based on whether lung ultrasound (LUS) or chest X-ray (CXR) was performed as the initial imaging test. The patients were then classified into three groups: 1) those with LUS/CXR results not suggestive of BP and PCT levels below 1 ng/mL, for whom no antibiotics were recommended; 2) those with LUS/CXR results suggestive of BP, inspite of the PCT value, for whom antibiotics were recommended; and 3) those with LUS/CXR results not suggestive of BP but with PCT levels above 1 ng/mL, for whom antibiotics were also recommended.

Out of the 194 patients, the image test did not suggest the presence of BP in 75 individuals with a PCT level below 1 ng/ml. 29/52 in the experimental group and 11/23 in the control group did not receive antibiotics. The image test indicated the presence of BP in 101 patients. 34/34 patients in the experimental group and 57/67 patients in the control group were prescribed antibiotics. Notably, there were statistically significant differences between the groups when the PCT level was below 1 ng/ml (p = 0.01). In 18 patients, the image test did not suggest BP, but their PCT level was above 1 ng/ml, and all of them were administered antibiotics. Additionally, a total of 0.035 mSv radiation per patient was avoided, and there was a 77% reduction in CXR per patient. The use of LUS did not result in a significant increase in costs.

Thus, it can be concluded that the utilization of LUS in conjunction with PCT was demonstrated to be a reliable strategy in the treatment of BP, without the necessity of radiation exposure or incurring additional costs.

Pediatric
2 Min Read
12 Jul

The combination of lung ultrasound and procalcitonin has the potential to enhance pneumonia management

A recent study demonstrated that the combination of lung ultrasound (LUS) and procalcitonin (PCT) proved to be a safe approach for treating bacterial pneumonia (BP), as it avoided the use of radiation and did not result in any additional costs. This study’s findings were published in the European Journal of Medical Research.

In this blinded, randomized clinical trial, a total of 194 children under the age of 18 with suspected bacterial pneumonia (BP) were enrolled. Among them, 96 children were randomly assigned to the experimental group (EG) and 98 children to the control group (CG). The randomization was based on whether lung ultrasound (LUS) or chest X-ray (CXR) was performed as the initial imaging test. The patients were then classified into three groups: 1) those with LUS/CXR results not suggestive of BP and PCT levels below 1 ng/mL, for whom no antibiotics were recommended; 2) those with LUS/CXR results suggestive of BP, inspite of the PCT value, for whom antibiotics were recommended; and 3) those with LUS/CXR results not suggestive of BP but with PCT levels above 1 ng/mL, for whom antibiotics were also recommended.

Out of the 194 patients, the image test did not suggest the presence of BP in 75 individuals with a PCT level below 1 ng/ml. 29/52 in the experimental group and 11/23 in the control group did not receive antibiotics. The image test indicated the presence of BP in 101 patients. 34/34 patients in the experimental group and 57/67 patients in the control group were prescribed antibiotics. Notably, there were statistically significant differences between the groups when the PCT level was below 1 ng/ml (p = 0.01). In 18 patients, the image test did not suggest BP, but their PCT level was above 1 ng/ml, and all of them were administered antibiotics. Additionally, a total of 0.035 mSv radiation per patient was avoided, and there was a 77% reduction in CXR per patient. The use of LUS did not result in a significant increase in costs.

Thus, it can be concluded that the utilization of LUS in conjunction with PCT was demonstrated to be a reliable strategy in the treatment of BP, without the necessity of radiation exposure or incurring additional costs.

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