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Found 139 results for Cardiology

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Videos

15 Feb

Heart Failure Peer Exchange Forum- Kolhapur

Eminent Cardiologists from Kolhapur share their practical experiences and insights on managing Heart Failure cases

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13 Feb

Heart Failure Peer Exchange Forum-Bangalore

Eminent Cardiologists from Bangalore share their practical experiences and insights on managing Heart Failure cases

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13 Feb

Heart Failure Peer Exchange Forum-Bangalore

Eminent Cardiologists from Bangaloreshare their practical experiences and insights on managing Heart Failure cases

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Medshorts

2Min Read
27 Feb

Acoramidis is safe and effective in transthyretin myloid cardiomyopathy

According to a new study, acoramidis, a high-affinity misfolded monomeric transthyretin (TTR) stabilizer, is safe and effective in transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy. This study’s findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

This phase 3, double-blind trial included 632 patients with transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy, who were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive acoramidis hydrochloride at a dose of 800 mg twice daily or a matching placebo for a period of 30 months. Efficacy was evaluated for patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of at least 30 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body surface area.  The primary hierarchical analysis comprised four key steps, encompassing death from any cause, hospitalization related to cardiovascular events, alterations from baseline in the N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level, and the alterations from baseline in the 6-minute walk distance. The secondary outcomes of the study were death from any cause, the 6-minute walk distance, the score on the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire-Overall Summary, and the serum TTR level.

At the end of the study, the primary analysis demonstrated a significant preference for acoramidis compared to placebo, the corresponding win ratio was 1.8, indicating that in 63.7% of pairwise comparisons, acoramidis was favoured, while placebo was favoured in 35.9%. The combination of deaths from any cause and cardiovascular-related hospitalization were responsible for over half of the wins and losses in the win ratio (58% of all pairwise comparisons). Additionally, NT-proBNP pairwise comparisons demonstrated the highest ratio of wins to losses (23.3% vs. 7.0%).

It was observed that, among patients with transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy, the administration of acoramidis resulted in a significantly better four-step primary hierarchical outcome, encompassing elements of mortality, morbidity, and function, compared to the placebo.

Acoramidis is safe and effective in transthyretin myloid cardiomyopathy

According to a new study, acoramidis, a high-affinity misfolded monomeric transthyretin (TTR) stabilizer, is safe and effective in transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy. This study’s findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

This phase 3, double-blind trial included 632 patients with transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy, who were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive acoramidis hydrochloride at a dose of 800 mg twice daily or a matching placebo for a period of 30 months. Efficacy was evaluated for patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of at least 30 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body surface area.  The primary hierarchical analysis comprised four key steps, encompassing death from any cause, hospitalization related to cardiovascular events, alterations from baseline in the N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level, and the alterations from baseline in the 6-minute walk distance. The secondary outcomes of the study were death from any cause, the 6-minute walk distance, the score on the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire-Overall Summary, and the serum TTR level.

At the end of the study, the primary analysis demonstrated a significant preference for acoramidis compared to placebo, the corresponding win ratio was 1.8, indicating that in 63.7% of pairwise comparisons, acoramidis was favoured, while placebo was favoured in 35.9%. The combination of deaths from any cause and cardiovascular-related hospitalization were responsible for over half of the wins and losses in the win ratio (58% of all pairwise comparisons). Additionally, NT-proBNP pairwise comparisons demonstrated the highest ratio of wins to losses (23.3% vs. 7.0%).

It was observed that, among patients with transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy, the administration of acoramidis resulted in a significantly better four-step primary hierarchical outcome, encompassing elements of mortality, morbidity, and function, compared to the placebo.

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2Min Read
27 Feb

Acoramidis is safe and effective in transthyretin myloid cardiomyopathy

According to a new study, acoramidis, a high-affinity misfolded monomeric transthyretin (TTR) stabilizer, is safe and effective in transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy. This study’s findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

This phase 3, double-blind trial included 632 patients with transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy, who were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive acoramidis hydrochloride at a dose of 800 mg twice daily or a matching placebo for a period of 30 months. Efficacy was evaluated for patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of at least 30 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body surface area.  The primary hierarchical analysis comprised four key steps, encompassing death from any cause, hospitalization related to cardiovascular events, alterations from baseline in the N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level, and the alterations from baseline in the 6-minute walk distance. The secondary outcomes of the study were death from any cause, the 6-minute walk distance, the score on the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire-Overall Summary, and the serum TTR level.

At the end of the study, the primary analysis demonstrated a significant preference for acoramidis compared to placebo, the corresponding win ratio was 1.8, indicating that in 63.7% of pairwise comparisons, acoramidis was favoured, while placebo was favoured in 35.9%. The combination of deaths from any cause and cardiovascular-related hospitalization were responsible for over half of the wins and losses in the win ratio (58% of all pairwise comparisons). Additionally, NT-proBNP pairwise comparisons demonstrated the highest ratio of wins to losses (23.3% vs. 7.0%).

It was observed that, among patients with transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy, the administration of acoramidis resulted in a significantly better four-step primary hierarchical outcome, encompassing elements of mortality, morbidity, and function, compared to the placebo.

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2Min Read
23 Feb

Early up-titration of hydralazine with evidence-based medications improves outcomes in severe systolic dysfunction and mitral regurgitation

According to a recent study, hydralazine combined with conventional therapy improves outcome in patients with severe systolic dysfunction and significant mitral regurgitation (MR). This study was published in the journal, ESC Heart Failure.

This study trial was an open-labelled, one-to-one ratio randomized designed. The 408 participants who were enrolled for this study had decompensated heart failure (HF) symptoms, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 35%, and mitral regurgitation (MR) more than moderate severity. Out of these, 203 patients were in the conventional treatment and 205 in hydralazine + conventional treatment, comprising of evidence-based medications (EBMs). Up-titration of hydralazine in conjunction with EBMs was administered to the hydralazine + conventional treatment group during the follow-up period and on Days 1–5 of the index admission. The end points of the study included cardiovascular (CV) death and HF rehospitalization.

After 3.5 years of mean follow-up period, it was found that 51% (104 out of 203 cases) reached endpoints in conventional group and 34.6% (71 out of 205 cases) in hydralazine + conventional treatment group, leading to a significant reduction in CV events. It was also noted that in-hospital death during the index admission was significantly higher in conventional group (5.4% vs. 0.5%, respectively).

Thus, it can be concluded that combining early up-titration of hydralazine with EBMs may improve outcome in patients with severe systolic dysfunction and significant MR, making it safe and well-tolerated for use.

Early up-titration of hydralazine with evidence-based medications improves outcomes in severe systolic dysfunction and mitral regurgitation

According to a recent study, hydralazine combined with conventional therapy improves outcome in patients with severe systolic dysfunction and significant mitral regurgitation (MR). This study was published in the journal, ESC Heart Failure.

This study trial was an open-labelled, one-to-one ratio randomized designed. The 408 participants who were enrolled for this study had decompensated heart failure (HF) symptoms, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 35%, and mitral regurgitation (MR) more than moderate severity. Out of these, 203 patients were in the conventional treatment and 205 in hydralazine + conventional treatment, comprising of evidence-based medications (EBMs). Up-titration of hydralazine in conjunction with EBMs was administered to the hydralazine + conventional treatment group during the follow-up period and on Days 1–5 of the index admission. The end points of the study included cardiovascular (CV) death and HF rehospitalization.

After 3.5 years of mean follow-up period, it was found that 51% (104 out of 203 cases) reached endpoints in conventional group and 34.6% (71 out of 205 cases) in hydralazine + conventional treatment group, leading to a significant reduction in CV events. It was also noted that in-hospital death during the index admission was significantly higher in conventional group (5.4% vs. 0.5%, respectively).

Thus, it can be concluded that combining early up-titration of hydralazine with EBMs may improve outcome in patients with severe systolic dysfunction and significant MR, making it safe and well-tolerated for use.

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2Min Read
23 Feb

Early up-titration of hydralazine with evidence-based medications improves outcomes in severe systolic dysfunction and mitral regurgitation

According to a recent study, hydralazine combined with conventional therapy improves outcome in patients with severe systolic dysfunction and significant mitral regurgitation (MR). This study was published in the journal, ESC Heart Failure.

This study trial was an open-labelled, one-to-one ratio randomized designed. The 408 participants who were enrolled for this study had decompensated heart failure (HF) symptoms, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 35%, and mitral regurgitation (MR) more than moderate severity. Out of these, 203 patients were in the conventional treatment and 205 in hydralazine + conventional treatment, comprising of evidence-based medications (EBMs). Up-titration of hydralazine in conjunction with EBMs was administered to the hydralazine + conventional treatment group during the follow-up period and on Days 1–5 of the index admission. The end points of the study included cardiovascular (CV) death and HF rehospitalization.

After 3.5 years of mean follow-up period, it was found that 51% (104 out of 203 cases) reached endpoints in conventional group and 34.6% (71 out of 205 cases) in hydralazine + conventional treatment group, leading to a significant reduction in CV events. It was also noted that in-hospital death during the index admission was significantly higher in conventional group (5.4% vs. 0.5%, respectively).

Thus, it can be concluded that combining early up-titration of hydralazine with EBMs may improve outcome in patients with severe systolic dysfunction and significant MR, making it safe and well-tolerated for use.

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2Min Read
27 Dec

Effectiveness of STEPSTONES transition program in increasing patient empowerment outcomes in congenital heart disease

A recent study suggests that the STEPSTONES-trial was effective in increasing patient empowerment, improving satisfaction with physical appearance, reducing parental involvement, and increasing disease-related knowledge in patients with congenital heart disease. This study was published in The Journal of Adolescent Health.

The STEPSTONES trial was a randomized controlled trial with a hybrid experimental design, embedded in a longitudinal observational study. Out of seven centers where the trial was conducted, two centers were allocated to the randomized controlled trial-arm, randomizing participants into intervention and control groups. The rest of the five centers were intervention-naïve centers, treated as a contamination check control group. The primary outcome of the study was an investigation of the empowering effect of a structured person-centred transition program. The secondary outcomes included readiness for transition as perceived by the parents. These outcomes were measured in 189 participants at the age of 16 years (baseline), 17 years, and 18.5 years.

At the end of the study, it was seen that the change in empowerment from 16 years to 18.5 years between the intervention group and control group was significantly in favor of the intervention group. As for the secondary outcomes, change over time was observed in parental involvement, satisfaction with physical appearance, and disease-related knowledge.

Based on the above results, it can be concluded that the STEPSTONES transition program may be effective in increasing patient empowerment outcomes in congenital heart disease.

Effectiveness of STEPSTONES transition program in increasing patient empowerment outcomes in congenital heart disease

A recent study suggests that the STEPSTONES-trial was effective in increasing patient empowerment, improving satisfaction with physical appearance, reducing parental involvement, and increasing disease-related knowledge in patients with congenital heart disease. This study was published in The Journal of Adolescent Health.

The STEPSTONES trial was a randomized controlled trial with a hybrid experimental design, embedded in a longitudinal observational study. Out of seven centers where the trial was conducted, two centers were allocated to the randomized controlled trial-arm, randomizing participants into intervention and control groups. The rest of the five centers were intervention-naïve centers, treated as a contamination check control group. The primary outcome of the study was an investigation of the empowering effect of a structured person-centred transition program. The secondary outcomes included readiness for transition as perceived by the parents. These outcomes were measured in 189 participants at the age of 16 years (baseline), 17 years, and 18.5 years.

At the end of the study, it was seen that the change in empowerment from 16 years to 18.5 years between the intervention group and control group was significantly in favor of the intervention group. As for the secondary outcomes, change over time was observed in parental involvement, satisfaction with physical appearance, and disease-related knowledge.

Based on the above results, it can be concluded that the STEPSTONES transition program may be effective in increasing patient empowerment outcomes in congenital heart disease.

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2Min Read
27 Dec

Effectiveness of STEPSTONES transition program in increasing patient empowerment outcomes in congenital heart disease

A recent study suggests that the STEPSTONES-trial was effective in increasing patient empowerment, improving satisfaction with physical appearance, reducing parental involvement, and increasing disease-related knowledge in patients with congenital heart disease. This study was published in The Journal of Adolescent Health.

The STEPSTONES trial was a randomized controlled trial with a hybrid experimental design, embedded in a longitudinal observational study. Out of seven centers where the trial was conducted, two centers were allocated to the randomized controlled trial-arm, randomizing participants into intervention and control groups. The rest of the five centers were intervention-naïve centers, treated as a contamination check control group. The primary outcome of the study was an investigation of the empowering effect of a structured person-centred transition program. The secondary outcomes included readiness for transition as perceived by the parents. These outcomes were measured in 189 participants at the age of 16 years (baseline), 17 years, and 18.5 years.

At the end of the study, it was seen that the change in empowerment from 16 years to 18.5 years between the intervention group and control group was significantly in favor of the intervention group. As for the secondary outcomes, change over time was observed in parental involvement, satisfaction with physical appearance, and disease-related knowledge.

Based on the above results, it can be concluded that the STEPSTONES transition program may be effective in increasing patient empowerment outcomes in congenital heart disease.

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