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Found 537 results for Dermatology

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29 Feb 24
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25 Jan 24
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Videos

16 Feb

Acne by Dr. Jimi Doshi

Dr. Jimi Doshi shares insights about Acne

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16 Feb

Crisaborole in Dermatology by Dr. Sheetal Motewar

Dr. Sheetal Motewar shares insights about Crisaborole in Dermatology

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15 Feb

Acne Vulgaris by Dr. Jagadish P

Dr. Jagadish P shares insights on Acne Vulgaris

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Medshorts

1Min Read
24 Jan

Intralesional bleomycin is a more effective treatment for cutaneous warts than cryotherapy

A recent study found that intralesional bleomycin was more effective than cryotherapy in treating cutaneous warts. This study’s findings were published in The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association.

A randomized controlled trial included 154 patients aged 18-60 years of either gender who were suffering from cutaneous warts for 1-48 weeks. Patients were divided into either group A treated with 0.1% intralesional bleomycin or group B treated with cryotherapy through non-probability consecutive sampling. Follow-up examinations were conducted at two, four, and six weeks. The analysis of the data was conducted using the SPSS 23.

After a period of 6 weeks intralesional bleomycin therapy was effective for 94.8% of group A patients, while cryotherapy was effective for 74% of group B patients.

Based on the findings, it can be concluded that intralesional bleomycin was more effective than cryotherapy for treating cutaneous warts.

Intralesional bleomycin is a more effective treatment for cutaneous warts than cryotherapy

A recent study found that intralesional bleomycin was more effective than cryotherapy in treating cutaneous warts. This study’s findings were published in The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association.

A randomized controlled trial included 154 patients aged 18-60 years of either gender who were suffering from cutaneous warts for 1-48 weeks. Patients were divided into either group A treated with 0.1% intralesional bleomycin or group B treated with cryotherapy through non-probability consecutive sampling. Follow-up examinations were conducted at two, four, and six weeks. The analysis of the data was conducted using the SPSS 23.

After a period of 6 weeks intralesional bleomycin therapy was effective for 94.8% of group A patients, while cryotherapy was effective for 74% of group B patients.

Based on the findings, it can be concluded that intralesional bleomycin was more effective than cryotherapy for treating cutaneous warts.

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1Min Read
24 Jan

Intralesional bleomycin is a more effective treatment for cutaneous warts than cryotherapy

A recent study found that intralesional bleomycin was more effective than cryotherapy in treating cutaneous warts. This study’s findings were published in The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association.

A randomized controlled trial included 154 patients aged 18-60 years of either gender who were suffering from cutaneous warts for 1-48 weeks. Patients were divided into either group A treated with 0.1% intralesional bleomycin or group B treated with cryotherapy through non-probability consecutive sampling. Follow-up examinations were conducted at two, four, and six weeks. The analysis of the data was conducted using the SPSS 23.

After a period of 6 weeks intralesional bleomycin therapy was effective for 94.8% of group A patients, while cryotherapy was effective for 74% of group B patients.

Based on the findings, it can be concluded that intralesional bleomycin was more effective than cryotherapy for treating cutaneous warts.

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2Min Read
19 Jan

Tildrakizumab safe and effective for use in long-term psoriasis management in older patients

A recent study found that tildrakizumab was safe and effective in long-term psoriasis management in older patients (≥ 65 years). The findings of this study were published in the journal, Acta dermato-venereologica.

This post hoc analysis of 2 phase III trials (reSURFACE1/2) included 1,862 patients who were administered 100 mg/200 mg of tildrakizumab at weeks 0/4/every 12 weeks thereafter. In reSURFACE1, at week 28, patients with ≥ 75% improvement in baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI75) were re-randomized to the same tildrakizumab dose or placebo. In reSURFACE2, PASI75 responders to 200 mg were re-randomized to 100 mg or 200 mg of tildrakizumab while PASI75 responders to 100 mg maintained their dose. An extension period (weeks 256/244) was entered by PASI50 responders at weeks 64/52 (reSURFACE1/2). The outcomes of the study included the proportion of patients with PASI < 3, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) 0/1, comorbidities, comedication, and side effects.

It was observed at the end of the study that the proportion of patients with a PASI < 3 was similar and maintained while the DLQI 0/1 proportions at week 52 were 66.8% and 72.0%/68.3% and 81.3%. In older patients, comorbidity and comedication were more common. From the above findings, it can be concluded that tildrakizumab may be safe and effective in patients ≥ 65 years for long-term psoriasis management.

Tildrakizumab safe and effective for use in long-term psoriasis management in older patients

A recent study found that tildrakizumab was safe and effective in long-term psoriasis management in older patients (≥ 65 years). The findings of this study were published in the journal, Acta dermato-venereologica.

This post hoc analysis of 2 phase III trials (reSURFACE1/2) included 1,862 patients who were administered 100 mg/200 mg of tildrakizumab at weeks 0/4/every 12 weeks thereafter. In reSURFACE1, at week 28, patients with ≥ 75% improvement in baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI75) were re-randomized to the same tildrakizumab dose or placebo. In reSURFACE2, PASI75 responders to 200 mg were re-randomized to 100 mg or 200 mg of tildrakizumab while PASI75 responders to 100 mg maintained their dose. An extension period (weeks 256/244) was entered by PASI50 responders at weeks 64/52 (reSURFACE1/2). The outcomes of the study included the proportion of patients with PASI < 3, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) 0/1, comorbidities, comedication, and side effects.

It was observed at the end of the study that the proportion of patients with a PASI < 3 was similar and maintained while the DLQI 0/1 proportions at week 52 were 66.8% and 72.0%/68.3% and 81.3%. In older patients, comorbidity and comedication were more common. From the above findings, it can be concluded that tildrakizumab may be safe and effective in patients ≥ 65 years for long-term psoriasis management.

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2Min Read
19 Jan

Tildrakizumab safe and effective for use in long-term psoriasis management in older patients

A recent study found that tildrakizumab was safe and effective in long-term psoriasis management in older patients (≥ 65 years). The findings of this study were published in the journal, Acta dermato-venereologica.

This post hoc analysis of 2 phase III trials (reSURFACE1/2) included 1,862 patients who were administered 100 mg/200 mg of tildrakizumab at weeks 0/4/every 12 weeks thereafter. In reSURFACE1, at week 28, patients with ≥ 75% improvement in baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI75) were re-randomized to the same tildrakizumab dose or placebo. In reSURFACE2, PASI75 responders to 200 mg were re-randomized to 100 mg or 200 mg of tildrakizumab while PASI75 responders to 100 mg maintained their dose. An extension period (weeks 256/244) was entered by PASI50 responders at weeks 64/52 (reSURFACE1/2). The outcomes of the study included the proportion of patients with PASI < 3, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) 0/1, comorbidities, comedication, and side effects.

It was observed at the end of the study that the proportion of patients with a PASI < 3 was similar and maintained while the DLQI 0/1 proportions at week 52 were 66.8% and 72.0%/68.3% and 81.3%. In older patients, comorbidity and comedication were more common. From the above findings, it can be concluded that tildrakizumab may be safe and effective in patients ≥ 65 years for long-term psoriasis management.

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2Min Read
18 Jan

Nemolizumab monotherapy significantly reduces signs and symptoms of prurigo nodularis

A recent study found that nemolizumab, an interleukin-31 receptor alpha antagonist, significantly reduces signs and symptoms of prurigo nodularis, a chronic, debilitating, and severely pruritic neuroimmunologic skin disease. This study’s results were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

This phase 3, multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial included 274 patients with moderate-to-severe prurigo nodularis. They received an initial dose of 60-mg of nemolizumab, which was followed by subcutaneous injections of 30 mg or 60 mg every 4 weeks for 16 weeks (n=183) or a matching placebo (n=91). The primary endpoints of the study were an itch response as measured by Peak Pruritus Numerical Rating Scale (PP-NRS) as well as an Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) response. The study has five key secondary endpoints.

At the end of the study, it was found that at week 16, the treatment efficacy of nemolizumab was shown with respect to both the primary endpoints. An itch response was seen among a greater percentage of patients in the nemolizumab group than in the placebo group. Similarly, the IGA response was also greater for the nemolizumab group. Benefits were seen for the five key secondary endpoints as well. Based on the above results, it can be concluded that nemolizumab monotherapy may significantly reduce signs and symptoms of prurigo nodularis.

Nemolizumab monotherapy significantly reduces signs and symptoms of prurigo nodularis

A recent study found that nemolizumab, an interleukin-31 receptor alpha antagonist, significantly reduces signs and symptoms of prurigo nodularis, a chronic, debilitating, and severely pruritic neuroimmunologic skin disease. This study’s results were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

This phase 3, multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial included 274 patients with moderate-to-severe prurigo nodularis. They received an initial dose of 60-mg of nemolizumab, which was followed by subcutaneous injections of 30 mg or 60 mg every 4 weeks for 16 weeks (n=183) or a matching placebo (n=91). The primary endpoints of the study were an itch response as measured by Peak Pruritus Numerical Rating Scale (PP-NRS) as well as an Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) response. The study has five key secondary endpoints.

At the end of the study, it was found that at week 16, the treatment efficacy of nemolizumab was shown with respect to both the primary endpoints. An itch response was seen among a greater percentage of patients in the nemolizumab group than in the placebo group. Similarly, the IGA response was also greater for the nemolizumab group. Benefits were seen for the five key secondary endpoints as well. Based on the above results, it can be concluded that nemolizumab monotherapy may significantly reduce signs and symptoms of prurigo nodularis.

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2Min Read
18 Jan

Nemolizumab monotherapy significantly reduces signs and symptoms of prurigo nodularis

A recent study found that nemolizumab, an interleukin-31 receptor alpha antagonist, significantly reduces signs and symptoms of prurigo nodularis, a chronic, debilitating, and severely pruritic neuroimmunologic skin disease. This study’s results were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

This phase 3, multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial included 274 patients with moderate-to-severe prurigo nodularis. They received an initial dose of 60-mg of nemolizumab, which was followed by subcutaneous injections of 30 mg or 60 mg every 4 weeks for 16 weeks (n=183) or a matching placebo (n=91). The primary endpoints of the study were an itch response as measured by Peak Pruritus Numerical Rating Scale (PP-NRS) as well as an Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) response. The study has five key secondary endpoints.

At the end of the study, it was found that at week 16, the treatment efficacy of nemolizumab was shown with respect to both the primary endpoints. An itch response was seen among a greater percentage of patients in the nemolizumab group than in the placebo group. Similarly, the IGA response was also greater for the nemolizumab group. Benefits were seen for the five key secondary endpoints as well. Based on the above results, it can be concluded that nemolizumab monotherapy may significantly reduce signs and symptoms of prurigo nodularis.

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